You rearrange me till I'm sane

invictascientia:

scorpion-flower:

Hurrem Sultan (1500–1558), the slave concubine who became a queen of the Ottoman Empire…

Also known as Roxelana, Sultan Hürrem has remained a contested and controversial figure in early modern Turkisk history. Her ruthless pragmatism, political genius and unparalleled patronage of charitable foundations in the Islamic spiritual centres of Mecca, Medina and Jerusalem all helped to solidify her political and pious persona in the annals and imaginations of Ottoman history forever after.

Hürrem was captured as a slave during a Tartar raid in Ruthenia; however, sources indicate her homeland to be present-day Ukraine, which was then part of the Kingdom of Poland. Hürrem was presented to the Ottoman Sultan Süleyman I “the Magnificent” (1520–1566), known to the Ottomans as “the Law Giver”, as a gift from his mother.

Hürrem’s charm and beauty facilitated her rise within the ranks of the harem, and soon she became Süleyman’s favorite concubine and later his beloved queen. Hürrem’s hastened and unprecedented transition from a harem slave to the queen of the Ottoman Empire provoked a contentious and vindictive response from both the governing classes and the general populace. Hürrem exerted immense influence over Süleyman and accompanied him as his political adviser to such an extent that members of the court claimed that he was bewitched by his queen.

Hürrem’s unique place in the Ottoman court was further conveyed through Süleyman’s contravention of dynastic traditions. Süleyman freed a slave concubine to make her his legal wife, allowed Hürrem to bear more than one son, and gave her access to imperial affairs that allowed her to replace the heir apparent with her own firstborn son. Finally, Süleyman gave away all of his concubines in marriage to remain faithful to Hürrem. During their forty-year monogamous romance, Hürrem bore Süleyman five children and reigned supreme in the imperial court as well as in his heart. Hürrem’s private letters to Süleyman and Süleyman’s amorous poetry for Hürrem indicate their desperate and passionate longing for each other during Süleyman’s long military campaigns. However, Hürrem’s yearning for Süleyman never distracted her from her political duties.

Diplomatic letters written to the kings of Poland document her important role in maintaining peaceful and cordial relations with her native land. Promoting her sons as legitimate heirs to the throne was Hürrem’s primary concern; however, she was aware of her unsavoury reputation in the court and empire and wanted to rectify this image to ensure an enduring legacy. Hürrem publicized her munificence through numerous commissions, including sacred and secular monuments. Her major commissions, particularly in the holy centres of the Islamic lands, were part of a larger building scheme. In Jerusalem, for example, she established a multi-purpose charity, which included a mosque, a hostel for religious pilgrims, an inn and stable for other travellers, public toilets, and a large soup kitchen. Hürrem had hoped to correct and construct her public persona through her patronage as a benevolent queen whose objectives included the welfare of her Ottoman subjects, international travellers and pilgrims.

Hürrem died on 18 April 1558 from malaria and colic, bearing the title haseki sultan (“mother of princes”). She is buried in a domed mausoleum adjacent to Süleyman’s at the Suleymaniye Mosque.

I should totally watch Magnificent Century…

Przeblogowuję, bo ciekawe, oraz, because #Lymond.

maya-bluemoon:

Draw a centaur day!He’s wearing traditional polish highland folk clothes.

Maja, you are a genius!

maya-bluemoon:

Draw a centaur day!
He’s wearing traditional polish highland folk clothes.

Maja, you are a genius!

berryofficial:

Minimalistic Poster design of Doctor Who

hollowcrownfans:

Has Benedict Cumberbatch been cast as Richard III for the second series of ‘The Hollow Crown’?

IT IS the mysterious case of Sherlock Holmes and their parallel careers: Benedict Cumberbatch is to star as Richard III in a television film while Martin Freeman is preparing to play the hunchback king on stage.

Source: The Sunday Times, http://www.thesundaytimes.co.uk/sto/news/uk_news/National/article1396873.ece?CMP=OTH-gnws-standard-2014_04_05
No official confirmation yet.
Follow us on Twitter @HollowCrownFans

hollowcrownfans:

Has Benedict Cumberbatch been cast as Richard III for the second series of ‘The Hollow Crown’?

IT IS the mysterious case of Sherlock Holmes and their parallel careers: Benedict Cumberbatch is to star as Richard III in a television film while Martin Freeman is preparing to play the hunchback king on stage.

Source: The Sunday Times, http://www.thesundaytimes.co.uk/sto/news/uk_news/National/article1396873.ece?CMP=OTH-gnws-standard-2014_04_05

No official confirmation yet.

Follow us on Twitter @HollowCrownFans

I have finally checked the Lymond and Dunnett tags and it resulted in me following a few new blogs and dancing with joy over finding fellow fans. 

joachimmurat:

Movies re-imagined for another time & place by Peter Stults

I’d pay fucktons of money to see these movies made with period-appropriate SFX and those actors. Just for kicks.

samantha-carter-is-my-muse:

1989nihil:

frodothedodo:

Has Stargate taught us nothing?

Apparently not… RUN!

samantha-carter-is-my-muse:

1989nihil:

frodothedodo:

Has Stargate taught us nothing?

Apparently not… RUN!

metalonmetalblog:

José Casado del Alisal (1832-1886)
Bell of Huesca (1880)
The Bell of Huesca is a legend describing how Ramiro II of Aragon, the Monk, cut off the heads of twelve nobles who did not obey him. The legend is told in the 13th-century anonymous Aragonese work the Cantar de la campana de Huesca.
After Alfonso I of Aragon died in 1134 leaving no descendents, his brother Ramiro II of Aragon, bishop of Roda de Isábena, inherited the Kingdom of Aragón, one of the states of the Iberian Peninsula. At that time the kingdom had serious domestic and foreign problems.
The Chronicle of San Juan de la Peña from the 14th century tells how Ramiro II became so concerned about his nobles abusing his patience that he sent a herald to the Abbey of Saint-Pons-de-Thomières to ask for advice from his former master.
The herald was shown the Abbey garden where the old monk removed the heads from roses that stood out from the rest (in other versions of the story, the roses are replaced by cabbages). The herald is then told to tell the king what he has seen.
After the heralds return, Ramiro II sent a message to the chief noble, saying that he wanted help in order to build a bell that could be heard all over the Aragonese Kingdom. As the nobles arrived, the king cut off their heads, building a circle with the heads, with the chief noble’s head suspended as the bell clapper. The result was then shown as an example to others.

Interestingly enough, there is an almost identical story in Livy’s “Ab urbe condita” (1.54) about Tarquinius Superbus, the last and most wicked of Rome’s seven monarchs. In this case it was Tarquinius who suggested an action to his son: instead of telling him how to deal with the citizens of the conquered city, he beheaded the tallest poppies in the garden. Sextus, the son, certainly got his dad’s meaning.

metalonmetalblog:

José Casado del Alisal (1832-1886)

Bell of Huesca (1880)

The Bell of Huesca is a legend describing how Ramiro II of Aragon, the Monk, cut off the heads of twelve nobles who did not obey him. The legend is told in the 13th-century anonymous Aragonese work the Cantar de la campana de Huesca.

After Alfonso I of Aragon died in 1134 leaving no descendents, his brother Ramiro II of Aragon, bishop of Roda de Isábena, inherited the Kingdom of Aragón, one of the states of the Iberian Peninsula. At that time the kingdom had serious domestic and foreign problems.

The Chronicle of San Juan de la Peña from the 14th century tells how Ramiro II became so concerned about his nobles abusing his patience that he sent a herald to the Abbey of Saint-Pons-de-Thomières to ask for advice from his former master.

The herald was shown the Abbey garden where the old monk removed the heads from roses that stood out from the rest (in other versions of the story, the roses are replaced by cabbages). The herald is then told to tell the king what he has seen.

After the heralds return, Ramiro II sent a message to the chief noble, saying that he wanted help in order to build a bell that could be heard all over the Aragonese Kingdom. As the nobles arrived, the king cut off their heads, building a circle with the heads, with the chief noble’s head suspended as the bell clapper. The result was then shown as an example to others.

Interestingly enough, there is an almost identical story in Livy’s “Ab urbe condita” (1.54) about Tarquinius Superbus, the last and most wicked of Rome’s seven monarchs. In this case it was Tarquinius who suggested an action to his son: instead of telling him how to deal with the citizens of the conquered city, he beheaded the tallest poppies in the garden. Sextus, the son, certainly got his dad’s meaning.

fer1972:

Today’s Classic: Pandora

1. By Arthur Rackham

2. By John William Waterhouse I

3. By Jules Joseph Lefebvre

4. By John William Waterhouse II

5. B Unknown Artist

amandaonwriting:

Bookish Comic